Newsstand

Speciale Dampyr n° 12 cover
 
Il segreto di Juliet - Morgan Lost 13 cover
 
Il viandante - Nathan Never 305 cover
 
Il fiore del male - Juric 01 cover
 

Bonelli Comics

Zagor Ludens
 
Le Storie Darkwood press
 
Magic Wind us version epicenter comics
 
julia brasile
 
Tex egmont Finlandia
 
Dylan Dog Libellus
 

1977

Ken Parker

Ken Parker

Ken Parker appears before us on a rainy day towards the end of 1868. A character "in the process of becoming" created by the script-writer Giancarlo Berardi and the illustrator Ivo Milazzo, he is destined to lose his brother at the beginning of the story, and to end up among the Hunkpapa Indians after losing all memory of who he is. While living among the Indians he takes the gentle Tecumseh as his wife, only to see her die, after which he sends little Theba (the son he acquired through marriage) to Boston; not until some years later does Ken decide to join Theba in the big city - where he finds his son almost grown-up - but he soon has to leave again. While this story started out as a traditional Western, it soon turned out to be an acquired taste for connoisseurs, and became increasingly transformed into a testing-ground for creative experiments by the duo Berardi-Milazzo. The difficulty of regularly producing stories of an adequate qualitative level forced the authors to close the monthly album and to try other alternatives, for instance publication in various container-magazines, or, later, in large-size color albums; eventually, in 1989, Berardi and Milazzo set up their own do-it-yourself press, Parker Editore, with which they proceeded, first, to publish a complete reprint of the fifty-nine issues of Ken Parker (in the Collana Serie Oro), and later to launch their own journal , "Ken Parker Magazine" (1992), which was to be taken over by Sergio Bonelli Editore two years later. But we will provide further details about this phase of the story a little later on… In any case, Ken Parker marked a turning-point in the western comic genre (and not only in this genre), both as regards its progressive-minded themes and also its innovative language.